ASMDA News


     

    ASMDA News

    Two Former SMDC Employees Inducted into ASMDA Wall of Honor

     

    As a part of the 14th Annual Space and Missile Defense Conference held at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, Ala., last week, the Air, Space and Missile Defense Association inducted four new members into the Space and Missile Defense Distinguished Civilians Wall of Honor Aug. 16.

    Two of those new members were former U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command employees.

    The Space and Missile Defense Distinguished Civilians Wall of Honor recognizes past members of government organizations dedicated to supporting efforts in space and missile defense. It is designed to honor selected civil servants who made a significant engineering, scientific, technical, analytical, management, or administrative contribution to the research, development, test, and evaluation of missile defense and space technologies or systems. Selected civil servants must also have consistently displayed a professional integrity and maintained a high level of commitment to the nation's missile defense and space missions.

    The two former USASMDC/ARSTRAT inductees are Joseph H. Butler and Dr. Rodney Robertson. The other two inductees are James D. Brower and George G. Williams. All four inductees distinguished themselves with significant and lasting contributions to the advancement of the missile defense of our country.

    Assisting in the induction ceremony was Lt. Gen. Richard P. Formica, commanding general, USASMDC/ARSTRAT, and Debra Wymer, ASMDA 2011 president.

    Over the past 17 years, 41 members have been inducted into the Space and Missile Defense Distinguished Civilians Wall of Honor. New members are nominated and selected every other year and are widely recognized as true giants of the profession.

    "The four honorees who were inducted today are part of the reason for the successes we enjoy today in missile defense and the nationwide respect that Huntsville enjoys today as a leading technology center," said Mr. Jesse Granone, the 2011 ASMDA Wall of Honor chairman and also a member of the Wall of Honor.

    Until recently, the Wall of Honor was displayed in the lobby of USASMDC/ARSTRAT on Redstone Arsenal. However, in the next few months, the Wall of Honor is being moved to its new home in the Davidson Center at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

    Interested parties should watch for the upcoming announcement for the ASMDA reception and ribbon-cutting ceremony.

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    SMDC Leader Addresses Local Space and Missile Defense Community

    By Jason B. Cutshaw, USASMDC/ARSTRAT Public Affairs - February 1, 2018

    HUNTSVILLE, Alabama -- Lt. Gen. James H. Dickinson, commanding general, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command, and commander of Joint Functional Component Command for Integrated Missile Defense, addressed the 23rd annual membership luncheon of the Air, Space and Missile Defense Association Jan. 30.

    "Research and development of new capabilities has been one of SMDC's core tasks since it began, 60 years ago," Dickinson said. "SMDC's 60th anniversary coincides closely with another 60th anniversary, the launch of the first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1. Explorer's effect on the course of our history can't be overstated."

    Dickinson spoke to the audience of more than 250 about his pride in the Army's legacy. Soon after building the nation's first space program, the Army provided the core facilities, material and personnel NASA and the Marshall Space Flight Center would become in 1960.

    He explained how The Army Ordnance and Missile Command and Army Ballistic Missile Agency transferred 4,700 Army civil service employees and more than $100 million worth of buildings and equipment to the Kennedy Space Center and on Redstone Arsenal.

    "From the Explorer 1 launch in 1958 to July 1, 1960, the Army achieved a series of pioneering efforts in space," Dickinson said. "It placed four Earth satellites into orbit; launched the free world's first lunar probe and first solar satellite; launched three chimps into space; led to the design of a 1.5 million-pound-thrust booster for a lunar exploration vehicle; and began work on the launch vehicle which would carry the first men into space."

    He said SMDC/ARSTRAT's role has evolved over the intervening years and the command now provides forces for space and missile defense operations that protect every American and enhance the Army's warfighting effectiveness and lethality.

    "We deliver critical space situational awareness and missile warning to the joint force," Dickinson said. "We build the Army's space cadre and execute life cycle management for more than 325 space operations officers supporting every level of command; we process, daily, more than half a million force tracking reports and disseminate them to hundreds of authorized users; we operate worldwide satellite communications for crucial U.S. and allied endeavors; we develop new capabilities; and we even provide U.S. Army astronauts to NASA."

    Dickinson thanked ASMDA for supporting the nation's air, space, and missile defense efforts, providing a community that enhances the workforce and helping foster education for the next generation of youth.

    "The Adventures in Engineering program gives my command and others a chance to expose local youth to the research, development, and testing that we do on Redstone Arsenal," Dickinson said. "You support our veterans across Northern Alabama and their families. The professional and civic involvement of ASMDA plays an important part in the strong and continuing relationship between the Army, NASA, and the Huntsville area that has lasted for more than 60 years."

    Dickinson expressed his appreciation for ASMDA's recognition of the individuals and teams who play vital roles in the defense of the nation by developing leading edge air, space, and missile defense technologies.

    During the luncheon ASMDA presented the Service Excellence Award, in the Team Category, to the SMDC Technical Center's Flight Experiment-1 Execution Teams -- Government and Contractor -- for their contributions to national defense. The award was accepted by Lee Ray, on behalf of the government team, and Bud Teague on behalf of the contractors.

    The Flight Experiment-1 Execution Teams supported all aspects of a highly successful launch of a hypersonic weapon, critical to determining the capability of the system's future use for cross domain fires. The test was sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and led by the U.S. Navy.

    "It is an honor to represent the command at the ASMDA awards luncheon," Ray said. "The awards for the FE-1 Government and Contractor teams mean a lot since the work performed by both teams is recognized. The FE-1 mission took a lot of hard work, personal sacrifices and tenacity for all involved. The mission was also exciting and fun at the same time as being very challenging."

    In 2017, ASMDA provided 16 full scholarships for 9- to 11 year olds to attend Space Camp and awarded four Loretta Spencer Scholarships and a General Dodgen Memorial Academic Scholarship.

    Additionally, the organization provided grants to support community events for veterans and presented space and missile defense technical achievement and service excellence awards.

    "For the past 23 years, the Air, Space and Missile Defense Association has been supporting those missions in the community and promoting items such as providing scholarships for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) students, Space Camp scholarships, and exposing students to opportunities on Redstone Arsenal through Adventures in Engineering," said ASMDA President Julie Schumacher. "Today is very exciting because we get to reunite with members of the community as well as hosting it in such a spectacular venue as the Space and Rocket Center's Davidson Center."

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    2017 Space Camp Announcement and Scholarship Application

    When: Sunday, 2 July 2017 – Friday, 7 July 2017

    Where: Space Camp at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama. See www.spacecamp.com for more information.

    Who: Any child, age 9-11, of a parent or guardian currently assigned to USASMDC/ARSTRAT, JFCC IMD, PEO-M&S, AMCOM, AMRDEC, MSIC, NASA Marshall, or MDA. Military, government civilian, including matrix personnel, and contractors working for corporate members of ASMDA can apply. Visit our webpage at www.ASMDA.us and click on Corporate Members. Military and government personnel must apply for free membership to ASMDA to be eligible.

    Selection Criteria: Essay, school grades, interest in science/space, location (goal of 2 HSV, 2 COS, 2 Kwajalein, 2 Alaska, and 2 Other), and financial need

    Click Here to Download the Scholarship Application

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    2016 ASMDA Space Camp Class

    The  ASMDA Space Camp Scholarship Class of 2016 just completed their week at Space Camp.  A luncheon was held in their honor on 6 July attended by Mayor Battle of Huntsville, Mayor Trulock of Madison, MG Hughes of MDA and other dignitaries from Redstone and the Huntsville community.  ASMDA's annual Space Camp Scholarship program is part of our STEM outreach and we sponsor a full class of 9-11 year olds at Space Camp in Huntsville, Alabama.  This year we had students from Kwajalein (2), Alaska (2), Colorado Springs (2), Huntsville (8) and Omaha and Virginia (16 total).  ASMDA Space Camp scholarships are open to all organizations supported by ASMDA as well as employees of corporate members of ASMDA.  Applications open in April and are typically due 1 May.  Applicants are evaluated on school grades and a handwritten essay covering a variety of space related topics.

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    ASMDA Scholars Attend Space Camp

    By Jason B. Cutshaw, USASMDC/ARSTRAT Public Affairs - July 7, 2016

    HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- Sixteen future explorers began their journey into the future this week in the Rocket City.

    The students; recipients of an Air, Space, and Missile Defense Association, or ASMDA, scholarship, spent July 3-8 at Space Camp at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville. On July 6, the scholarship winners were treated to lunch by members of the ASMDA board and had a chance to speak with those who made the week possible.

    Col. Thomas Nguyen, chief of staff, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command, told the students they may someday be the ones leading America on its journey into space.

    "I am sure you have all heard of NASA's Juno Satellite," Nguyen said. "Juno has been on a journey for five years to get to Jupiter and as of two days ago it finally arrived. We go to places like Jupiter because it is in our human nature to explore and to find out answers to tough questions about life, our planet, our solar system and our universe. We have an innate drive to understand, to expand our horizons, to quench our curiosity and fulfil our desire for knowledge.

    "All of this is due to our incredible curiosity, the same type of curiosity inside you that brought you all to Space Camp," he added. "Most everyone here is curious about spaceflight and other planets. That is great, however, I would ask you not to limit your interest to one or two subjects. Our world is a complex and wonderful place, and other worlds even more so. So whether you want to become an astronaut or something else, greatness in this life will require you to work hard and be ambitious."

    Since 1996, ASMDA has awarded scholarships to children, ages 9-11, of a parent or guardian currently assigned to the USASMDC/ARSTRAT; Program Executive Office, Missiles and Space; Joint Functional Component Command for Integrated Missile Defense; Missile and Space Intelligence Center; NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; or Missile Defense Agency, whether military or government civilian.

    The 16 Space Camp students this year are from Madison, Gurley and Huntsville; Fort Greely and Delta Junction, Alaska; Peyton and Colorado Springs, Colorado; Omaha, Nebraska; Alexandria, Virginia; and Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. They are: Regan Caple, Jennifer Hamm, Braeden Hayes, Skylar Hayes, Paul Lee, Porter Mroszczyk, Matthew Snodgrass, Aleksandar Vukosavljevic, Joshua Brower, Julianna Williams, Kira Bailey, Trystan Hartzell, Maya Yee, Thomas von Ahlefeld, Ava Moore and Kendal Warren.

    Nguyen talked to the campers and told them how proud everyone was of them for being selected and congratulated them on receiving the scholarships.

    "I would like to thank the U.S. Space and Rocket Center and ASMDA for giving me this opportunity to speak to you and for providing a place where children, both young and old, can learn about space exploration," Nguyen said. "Every day is a great day when we get a chance to interact with our bright young adventurers and future leaders of this nation. Thank you for your interest and your dedication in the pursuit of learning. You will realize in the near future that learning is a lifetime activity.

    "Let your curiosity guide you and drive you to a greater understanding of your world and worlds beyond," he added. "You owe it to yourself to always be inquisitive, and to seek answers, possibly to questions that we have yet to ask. You all have it in you to be astronauts or mathematicians or politicians or whatever you want to be in life. I applaud you for your willingness to learn and encourage you to keep reaching for the stars."

    After the luncheon, some of the campers spoke about what they had learned and how excited they were to be at Space Camp.

    "I have enjoyed my time at Space Camp," said Kira Bailey from Colorado. "The missions are great because you get to start out on the space shuttle and go to the International Space Station to experiment. I was a payload specialist and it was exciting.

    "Space Camp is really fun and if you like space, then you are going to like it a lot," she added.

    During the week, the children participated in activities including rocket construction and launch, water activities, a simulated Space Shuttle mission, Mars mission simulators, Manned Maneuvering Unit, Multi-Axis Trainer, and an IMAX movie.

    "The mission is the best part," said Aleksandar Vukosavljevic from Alabama. "I like the experiments where we mixed two chemicals and made slime. This is fun and if you like space, you should come here."

    "I like that everyone is from different places and they have told me how life is where they are from," he added.

    The students were selected for the scholarship based on an essay, school grades, interest in science and space, and financial need. The scholarship covers one week at Space Camp, travel, a flight suit, clothing package, a calling card and spending money.

    "My favorite part of Space Camp has probably been the simulators," said Julianna Williams from Alaska. "There is one that is like a hamster ball with rings around it and you spin backwards, forwards, sideways and it is really fun. I enjoy it here because I get to learn things and see all the rockets.

    "This is a great experience, and if you have the chance, you should come to Space Camp," she added.

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Two Former SMDC Employees Inducted into ASMDA Wall of Honor

     

    As a part of the 14th Annual Space and Missile Defense Conference held at the Von Braun Center in Huntsville, Ala., last week, the Air, Space and Missile Defense Association inducted four new members into the Space and Missile Defense Distinguished Civilians Wall of Honor Aug. 16.

    Two of those new members were former U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command employees.

    The Space and Missile Defense Distinguished Civilians Wall of Honor recognizes past members of government organizations dedicated to supporting efforts in space and missile defense. It is designed to honor selected civil servants who made a significant engineering, scientific, technical, analytical, management, or administrative contribution to the research, development, test, and evaluation of missile defense and space technologies or systems. Selected civil servants must also have consistently displayed a professional integrity and maintained a high level of commitment to the nation's missile defense and space missions.

    The two former USASMDC/ARSTRAT inductees are Joseph H. Butler and Dr. Rodney Robertson. The other two inductees are James D. Brower and George G. Williams. All four inductees distinguished themselves with significant and lasting contributions to the advancement of the missile defense of our country.

    Assisting in the induction ceremony was Lt. Gen. Richard P. Formica, commanding general, USASMDC/ARSTRAT, and Debra Wymer, ASMDA 2011 president.

    Over the past 17 years, 41 members have been inducted into the Space and Missile Defense Distinguished Civilians Wall of Honor. New members are nominated and selected every other year and are widely recognized as true giants of the profession.

    "The four honorees who were inducted today are part of the reason for the successes we enjoy today in missile defense and the nationwide respect that Huntsville enjoys today as a leading technology center," said Mr. Jesse Granone, the 2011 ASMDA Wall of Honor chairman and also a member of the Wall of Honor.

    Until recently, the Wall of Honor was displayed in the lobby of USASMDC/ARSTRAT on Redstone Arsenal. However, in the next few months, the Wall of Honor is being moved to its new home in the Davidson Center at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center.

    Interested parties should watch for the upcoming announcement for the ASMDA reception and ribbon-cutting ceremony.

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    SMDC Leader Addresses Local Space and Missile Defense Community

    By Jason B. Cutshaw, USASMDC/ARSTRAT Public Affairs - February 1, 2018

    HUNTSVILLE, Alabama -- Lt. Gen. James H. Dickinson, commanding general, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command, and commander of Joint Functional Component Command for Integrated Missile Defense, addressed the 23rd annual membership luncheon of the Air, Space and Missile Defense Association Jan. 30.

    "Research and development of new capabilities has been one of SMDC's core tasks since it began, 60 years ago," Dickinson said. "SMDC's 60th anniversary coincides closely with another 60th anniversary, the launch of the first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1. Explorer's effect on the course of our history can't be overstated."

    Dickinson spoke to the audience of more than 250 about his pride in the Army's legacy. Soon after building the nation's first space program, the Army provided the core facilities, material and personnel NASA and the Marshall Space Flight Center would become in 1960.

    He explained how The Army Ordnance and Missile Command and Army Ballistic Missile Agency transferred 4,700 Army civil service employees and more than $100 million worth of buildings and equipment to the Kennedy Space Center and on Redstone Arsenal.

    "From the Explorer 1 launch in 1958 to July 1, 1960, the Army achieved a series of pioneering efforts in space," Dickinson said. "It placed four Earth satellites into orbit; launched the free world's first lunar probe and first solar satellite; launched three chimps into space; led to the design of a 1.5 million-pound-thrust booster for a lunar exploration vehicle; and began work on the launch vehicle which would carry the first men into space."

    He said SMDC/ARSTRAT's role has evolved over the intervening years and the command now provides forces for space and missile defense operations that protect every American and enhance the Army's warfighting effectiveness and lethality.

    "We deliver critical space situational awareness and missile warning to the joint force," Dickinson said. "We build the Army's space cadre and execute life cycle management for more than 325 space operations officers supporting every level of command; we process, daily, more than half a million force tracking reports and disseminate them to hundreds of authorized users; we operate worldwide satellite communications for crucial U.S. and allied endeavors; we develop new capabilities; and we even provide U.S. Army astronauts to NASA."

    Dickinson thanked ASMDA for supporting the nation's air, space, and missile defense efforts, providing a community that enhances the workforce and helping foster education for the next generation of youth.

    "The Adventures in Engineering program gives my command and others a chance to expose local youth to the research, development, and testing that we do on Redstone Arsenal," Dickinson said. "You support our veterans across Northern Alabama and their families. The professional and civic involvement of ASMDA plays an important part in the strong and continuing relationship between the Army, NASA, and the Huntsville area that has lasted for more than 60 years."

    Dickinson expressed his appreciation for ASMDA's recognition of the individuals and teams who play vital roles in the defense of the nation by developing leading edge air, space, and missile defense technologies.

    During the luncheon ASMDA presented the Service Excellence Award, in the Team Category, to the SMDC Technical Center's Flight Experiment-1 Execution Teams -- Government and Contractor -- for their contributions to national defense. The award was accepted by Lee Ray, on behalf of the government team, and Bud Teague on behalf of the contractors.

    The Flight Experiment-1 Execution Teams supported all aspects of a highly successful launch of a hypersonic weapon, critical to determining the capability of the system's future use for cross domain fires. The test was sponsored by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and led by the U.S. Navy.

    "It is an honor to represent the command at the ASMDA awards luncheon," Ray said. "The awards for the FE-1 Government and Contractor teams mean a lot since the work performed by both teams is recognized. The FE-1 mission took a lot of hard work, personal sacrifices and tenacity for all involved. The mission was also exciting and fun at the same time as being very challenging."

    In 2017, ASMDA provided 16 full scholarships for 9- to 11 year olds to attend Space Camp and awarded four Loretta Spencer Scholarships and a General Dodgen Memorial Academic Scholarship.

    Additionally, the organization provided grants to support community events for veterans and presented space and missile defense technical achievement and service excellence awards.

    "For the past 23 years, the Air, Space and Missile Defense Association has been supporting those missions in the community and promoting items such as providing scholarships for STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) students, Space Camp scholarships, and exposing students to opportunities on Redstone Arsenal through Adventures in Engineering," said ASMDA President Julie Schumacher. "Today is very exciting because we get to reunite with members of the community as well as hosting it in such a spectacular venue as the Space and Rocket Center's Davidson Center."

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    2017 Space Camp Announcement and Scholarship Application

    When: Sunday, 2 July 2017 – Friday, 7 July 2017

    Where: Space Camp at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama. See www.spacecamp.com for more information.

    Who: Any child, age 9-11, of a parent or guardian currently assigned to USASMDC/ARSTRAT, JFCC IMD, PEO-M&S, AMCOM, AMRDEC, MSIC, NASA Marshall, or MDA. Military, government civilian, including matrix personnel, and contractors working for corporate members of ASMDA can apply. Visit our webpage at www.ASMDA.us and click on Corporate Members. Military and government personnel must apply for free membership to ASMDA to be eligible.

    Selection Criteria: Essay, school grades, interest in science/space, location (goal of 2 HSV, 2 COS, 2 Kwajalein, 2 Alaska, and 2 Other), and financial need

    Click Here to Download the Scholarship Application

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    2016 ASMDA Space Camp Class

    The  ASMDA Space Camp Scholarship Class of 2016 just completed their week at Space Camp.  A luncheon was held in their honor on 6 July attended by Mayor Battle of Huntsville, Mayor Trulock of Madison, MG Hughes of MDA and other dignitaries from Redstone and the Huntsville community.  ASMDA's annual Space Camp Scholarship program is part of our STEM outreach and we sponsor a full class of 9-11 year olds at Space Camp in Huntsville, Alabama.  This year we had students from Kwajalein (2), Alaska (2), Colorado Springs (2), Huntsville (8) and Omaha and Virginia (16 total).  ASMDA Space Camp scholarships are open to all organizations supported by ASMDA as well as employees of corporate members of ASMDA.  Applications open in April and are typically due 1 May.  Applicants are evaluated on school grades and a handwritten essay covering a variety of space related topics.

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    ASMDA Scholars Attend Space Camp

    By Jason B. Cutshaw, USASMDC/ARSTRAT Public Affairs - July 7, 2016

    HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- Sixteen future explorers began their journey into the future this week in the Rocket City.

    The students; recipients of an Air, Space, and Missile Defense Association, or ASMDA, scholarship, spent July 3-8 at Space Camp at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville. On July 6, the scholarship winners were treated to lunch by members of the ASMDA board and had a chance to speak with those who made the week possible.

    Col. Thomas Nguyen, chief of staff, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command, told the students they may someday be the ones leading America on its journey into space.

    "I am sure you have all heard of NASA's Juno Satellite," Nguyen said. "Juno has been on a journey for five years to get to Jupiter and as of two days ago it finally arrived. We go to places like Jupiter because it is in our human nature to explore and to find out answers to tough questions about life, our planet, our solar system and our universe. We have an innate drive to understand, to expand our horizons, to quench our curiosity and fulfil our desire for knowledge.

    "All of this is due to our incredible curiosity, the same type of curiosity inside you that brought you all to Space Camp," he added. "Most everyone here is curious about spaceflight and other planets. That is great, however, I would ask you not to limit your interest to one or two subjects. Our world is a complex and wonderful place, and other worlds even more so. So whether you want to become an astronaut or something else, greatness in this life will require you to work hard and be ambitious."

    Since 1996, ASMDA has awarded scholarships to children, ages 9-11, of a parent or guardian currently assigned to the USASMDC/ARSTRAT; Program Executive Office, Missiles and Space; Joint Functional Component Command for Integrated Missile Defense; Missile and Space Intelligence Center; NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; or Missile Defense Agency, whether military or government civilian.

    The 16 Space Camp students this year are from Madison, Gurley and Huntsville; Fort Greely and Delta Junction, Alaska; Peyton and Colorado Springs, Colorado; Omaha, Nebraska; Alexandria, Virginia; and Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. They are: Regan Caple, Jennifer Hamm, Braeden Hayes, Skylar Hayes, Paul Lee, Porter Mroszczyk, Matthew Snodgrass, Aleksandar Vukosavljevic, Joshua Brower, Julianna Williams, Kira Bailey, Trystan Hartzell, Maya Yee, Thomas von Ahlefeld, Ava Moore and Kendal Warren.

    Nguyen talked to the campers and told them how proud everyone was of them for being selected and congratulated them on receiving the scholarships.

    "I would like to thank the U.S. Space and Rocket Center and ASMDA for giving me this opportunity to speak to you and for providing a place where children, both young and old, can learn about space exploration," Nguyen said. "Every day is a great day when we get a chance to interact with our bright young adventurers and future leaders of this nation. Thank you for your interest and your dedication in the pursuit of learning. You will realize in the near future that learning is a lifetime activity.

    "Let your curiosity guide you and drive you to a greater understanding of your world and worlds beyond," he added. "You owe it to yourself to always be inquisitive, and to seek answers, possibly to questions that we have yet to ask. You all have it in you to be astronauts or mathematicians or politicians or whatever you want to be in life. I applaud you for your willingness to learn and encourage you to keep reaching for the stars."

    After the luncheon, some of the campers spoke about what they had learned and how excited they were to be at Space Camp.

    "I have enjoyed my time at Space Camp," said Kira Bailey from Colorado. "The missions are great because you get to start out on the space shuttle and go to the International Space Station to experiment. I was a payload specialist and it was exciting.

    "Space Camp is really fun and if you like space, then you are going to like it a lot," she added.

    During the week, the children participated in activities including rocket construction and launch, water activities, a simulated Space Shuttle mission, Mars mission simulators, Manned Maneuvering Unit, Multi-Axis Trainer, and an IMAX movie.

    "The mission is the best part," said Aleksandar Vukosavljevic from Alabama. "I like the experiments where we mixed two chemicals and made slime. This is fun and if you like space, you should come here."

    "I like that everyone is from different places and they have told me how life is where they are from," he added.

    The students were selected for the scholarship based on an essay, school grades, interest in science and space, and financial need. The scholarship covers one week at Space Camp, travel, a flight suit, clothing package, a calling card and spending money.

    "My favorite part of Space Camp has probably been the simulators," said Julianna Williams from Alaska. "There is one that is like a hamster ball with rings around it and you spin backwards, forwards, sideways and it is really fun. I enjoy it here because I get to learn things and see all the rockets.

    "This is a great experience, and if you have the chance, you should come to Space Camp," she added.

    …………………………………………………………………………………………………………